Found Buk missile parts in final report Dutch Safety Board

Following the reports on Monday, June 6th, 2016, on Buk missile parts found during the MH17 investigation, the Dutch Safety Board cares to explain that this does not involve recently found items. It concerns parts recovered during the Dutch Safety Board’s investigation into MH17.

Following the reports on Monday, June 6th, 2016, on Buk missile parts found during the MH17 investigation, the Dutch Safety Board cares to explain that this does not involve recently found items. It concerns parts recovered during the Dutch Safety Board’s investigation into MH17.

The final report 'MH17 Crash’, section 2.12.2.8 (digital report page 80, printed report page 82) includes the following with regard to the parts:

During the recovery of the wreckage, a number of parts that did not originate from the aeroplane and its content were found in the wreckage area. The parts found appeared to be connected with a surface-to-air missile. The parts that were suspected to be related to a surface-to-air missile were transported to the Gilze-Rijen Air Force Base in the same way as the aeroplane wreckage was. On arrival the parts underwent the same examination as the pieces of aeroplane wreckage. Subsequently the parts that were suspected to be related to a surface-to-air missile were subjected to forensic examination, as part of the criminal investigation (see Section 2.16 of the report ‘MH17 Crash’). In order to not risk impeding the criminal investigation, the Dutch Safety Board has decided not to publish images of all of the recovered fragments that were presented to the Annex 13 partners during the progress meeting in August 2015...”


The same section also contains the images shown above, of three of the parts found, together with the following text:

“The shape and form of the parts recovered is consistent with a 9M38 series surface-to-air missile. Images of three of the recovered parts are shown in Figure 36 together with an indication of origin on a 9M38 series surface-to-air missile; namely an engine nozzle (1), part of one of the four stabilizer fins (2) and a data cable (3).”

On August 11, 2015, the Dutch Safety Board and the Joint Investigation Team (JIT ) released a joint statement on the discovery of the parts and the fact that these parts would be included in both the criminal investigation and the investigation into the causes of the crash.